It’s all about interviews these days, it seems.

My dear friend Tim over at the Food For The Beloved blog did a cool/funny/interesting interview with another dear friend of mine, Chris Morrissey (Bill Mike Band). Everyone who reads this will laugh, but the musicians will get the most out of it.  Here’s a great excerpt…

Lately I’ve been working a lot on time.  Meaning, I’ll set a metronome and think of it as the 2 and 4 of a measure like it’s the drummer’s high hat and i’ll just walk (meaning the classic quarter note jazz baseline).  I’ll either do this free of form, or to a 12 bar blues.  I try to make the metronome disappear.  You actually stop hearing it… and the conscious impulse is shake yourself out of the state you’re in and FIND THAT METRONOME, but that’s what I’m trying to teach myself.  Total trust of my internal metronome.  This is where groove comes from.  People playing independent of eachother, each with their own confident sense of time and the happenstance relationship between those entities is what makes things feel good.  One of my favorite bassists Reid Anderson (The Bad Plus) says that it’s about throwing away the idea that you need to “hook up” with the other players to create groove.  I think this “hooking up” creates a very one-dimensional groove.  That’s why if you listen to African or Indian music there can be very complicated rhythm but it’s still so GROOVING!  The D’Angelo record “Voodoo” is a good example even though it wasn’t organically recorded.  There are things in seemingly different universes from eachother but it works and mind bogglingly well I might add.  I’ve learned from my own development and watching some of my more advanced students mature harmonically before they do rhythmically that rhythm is really where you separate the men from boys…

Read the whole thing here.

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